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Information and Privacy Commissioner releases Review Report 16-03

A public body may disclose personal information if the disclosure is not an unreasonable invasion of a third party's personal privacy.  In this case an applicant, a former foster child, sought the name of his father contained in the Department of Community Service's file.  The Commissioner recommends that the name be disclosed because disclosing that information would not be an unreasonable invasion of privacy given the likelihood that the applicant's father died more than 30 years ago, the change in attitudes regarding the birth of a child out of wedlock and the fact that the information is 85 years old.  Read more...


Information and Privacy Commissioner releases Review Report 16-02

After his release from a correctional facility, the applicant became concerned that facility staff were continuing to access his personal information without authorization.  He therefore sought access to records about himself and a list of persons who had accessed his information in the correction system database.  The Department of Justice ("Department") found a six page incident reporting form and an audit log.  It withheld certain information citing three exemptions from disclosure:  harm to the security of the system, endangerment of any person's life or safety and unreasonable invasion of personal privacy.  Read more...


ANNOUNCEMENT

March 1, 2016

Information Commissioners call on governments to create a duty to document

Canada's Information Commissioners have called on their respective governments to create a legislated duty requiring public entities to document matters related to their deliberations, actions and decisions.  Read more... 

Read the joint resolution

Read the backgrounder


ANNOUNCEMENT

February 23, 2016

Access and privacy regulators call on governments to respect rights in information sharing initiatives

Canada's Information and Privacy Commissioners and Ombudspersons have called on all levels of government to protect and promote privacy and access to information rights when embarking on information sharing initiatives aimed at improving government services.  Read more...  

Read the joint resolution


NEWS RELEASE

For Immediate Release

February 11, 2016

N.S. Information and Privacy Commissioner releases investigation report about disclosure of former cabinet minister's personal information

HALIFAX - In an investigation report released today, Catherine Tully, Nova Scotia's Information and Privacy Commissioner finds that the Office of the Premier was in violation of Nova Scotia's privacy law when the former Chief of Staff publicly disclosed personal information of a former cabinet minister.  The report recommends changes that will strengthen and modernize the Office of the Premier's privacy controls.  Read the full press release and backgrounder here.  

Read report IR16-01 here


Information and Privacy Commissioner releases Review Report 16-01

Businesses that interact with government are generally unfamiliar with the accountability regime set out in the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act ("FOIPOP").  In order for a public body such as Nova Scotia Business Inc. ("NSBI") to withhold third party business information, NSBI must satisfy a three part test.  Included in that test is a requirement that the disclosure would result in a reasonable expectatation of harm to the third party business.  When businesses are consulted by public bodies such as NSBI, they often insist that business information should be held confidential without any evidence that harm would occur from the disclosure.  It is no doubt a challenge for organizations such as NSBI to educate their business partners to better understand NSBI's very important accountability obligations.  In this case, neither NSBI nor any third party provided evidence of harm from the disclosure of the requested information.  As a result, the Commissioner recommends full disclosure of information relating to the government's payroll rebate program.  Read more...


Review Officer releases 2014-2015 Annual Report 

Today Catherine Tully, Nova Scotia’s Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Review Officer, released her office’s annual report for 2014-15. In the report, Tully describes a vision of a Nova Scotia government that actively discloses vital information, and that vigorously protects the privacy of its citizens.  Read more...

View the 2014-2015 Annual Report


Time Extension Guidelines - Municipal Government Act

Time Extension Request Form - Municipal Government Act

Privacy Management Program Gap Analysis for Public Bodies and Municipalities

Reasonable Security Checklist for Personal Information

PHIA Fee Fact Sheet - Personal Health Information Act

Privacy Management Program Toolkit for Health Custodians - Personal Health Information Act